In case you missed it and were out enjoying your weekend (yay for you!), I shared a post on Saturday about my fabulous new glass door knobs.

We have been in our stone cottage for 9 months now and, although none of the rooms are complete, our small dining area is as put together as it’s going to get (at least for now).The kitchen and dining area are attached but the kitchen isn’t quite ready for its photo op, so we’ll just tour the new and improved dining area.

Turning a small dining area into a welcoming dining room with paint and rustic farmhouse touches. | Chatfield Court

This is how the space looked before we moved our stuff in. Pale yellow walls and a light fixture that was barely hanging on, literally.

Small dining area makeover | Chatfield CourtThe previous owner had window blinds in every window of the house, and they were all in rough shape. Can you see that little hook in the ceiling by the big window? Yeah, they were all over the house too. 

In every room…

Some of the rooms had several. 

Not a huge deal but they were unsightly, in my eyes anyway, and kind of a pain to fix. (Clearly they were a huge deal to me. 😉 )

The room had great bones. There’s nice crown molding and the walls were freshly painted before the previous owners put the house on the market. It was in decent shape, but it needed a bit of updating and a new coat of paint (something other than yellow).

The first thing I did was to fix and paint the walls. Our house is 70 years old with plaster walls which means that every time you want to hang something, or remove it, you end up with a pretty big, nasty hole. Once the holes were fixed, I moved on to paint. I used Benjamin Moore Paper White, which is a very pale gray. 

Small dining area makeover | Chatfield Court

All of the walls in the house are smooth except for the ones around the fireplace. Not sure why they used these textured wall boards but someone thought they were a good idea. I’m not a fan and, besides my major dislike, they are tough to paint. I’m so glad they didn’t use throughout the whole house.

Small dining area makeover | Chatfield Court

I didn’t have a huge block of time to paint the whole room (dining and kitchen) at once so I did one wall at a time. We also worked on electrical outlets and light switches when we did each wall. With this old house came some pretty grungy looking switches. They were dirty and painted over in the whole house so, as we do a room, they also get changed (and checked to make sure they are safe).

Another fix was the old door bell box. It was a real eyesore. We haven’t been able to get the old door bell to work since we moved in so we ended up buying a wireless one. The old box was still attached in the dining area so I removed it, fixed the giant-sized holes, and painted the wall. It’s so nice to sit down to eat and not look up at that old, ugly box. 

Small dining area makeover | Chatfield Court

Another change we made to the room was the hanging light fixture. The one that we adopted when we moved in was ok but not my style. It was also barely hanging on so this was a project we tackled right after we moved in. 

I found this beauty in a little boutique on a trip to the coast. The hubs wasn’t sold on it but I loved it right away. In my book, that usually means it’s the right choice. The reclaimed wood shelves on the far wall are a new addition to this room too. I shared all the details about how we made them, and what was there before, here.

Once the walls were painted, I moved to the old casement windows. I just recently finished painting them black and I love them! You can check out the before and after, here.

The dirty, old blinds were also replaced with a gorgeous woven shade. It doesn’t block the view or the light but it does add texture and warmth to the window.

The vintage dresser turned storage cabinet stayed in it’s original spot and I hung my tobacco basket back up. I did get 2 new lamps and added this old wooden bowl that I found at a thrift store.

Awesome small dining area decor ideas! Turning a boring space into a welcoming dining room with paint and rustic farmhouse touches. | Chatfield CourtAwesome dining area decor ideas! Turning a boring space into a welcoming dining room with paint and rustic farmhouse touches. | Chatfield CourtA recent addition to this space is the pedestal dining table. I had a solid oak table in here, that I’ve had for years, and I was just getting ready to refinish it when I found this one for $50. It’s a vintage solid teak table that was brought over from Indonesia with the woman who owned it. It has a some issues but the wood is gorgeous and it really is a better fit. The chairs seem a bit big compared to the table so they may get changed down the road, but they’re ok for right now.

Awesome small dining area decor ideas! Turning a small, boring space into a welcoming dining room with paint, new lighting and rustic farmhouse touches. | Chatfield Court

This corner of the room has stayed the same since we moved in. I putz around with the decor on the buffet a lot and I’ve been having fun changing the chalkboard art. Don’t worry, I am under no illusions that I am a great artist. 😉

Awesome small dining area decor ideas! Turning a small, boring space into a welcoming dining room with paint and rustic farmhouse touches. | Chatfield CourtI think we’ve covered every inch of the dining area. It feels good to finally have a space done. There’s still a few things I need to address, like the chairs and fixing the table, but I love this space and I’m thrilled with the way it turned out.

Thanks for stopping by. Hope you have a great week!

Dining Area Sources

(Affiliate links used. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, I will receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. Please see my Privacy Policy for more info.)

  • White cabinet – bought from local seller in Illinois; painted with BM White Dove 
  • Wooden lamps – Pier 1 (affiliate link) no longer on their website
  • Wooden bowl – thrift store
  • Ironstone pitcher – Etsy
  • Tobacco basket – antique/flea market
  • White and black striped pillow cover – Etsy
  • Small wooden stool with dipped legs – Serena and Lily (affiliate link)
  • 2 tiered tray – World Market (affiliate link)
  • Bar stools – Target (affiliate link)
  • Pedestal dining table – bought from local online seller
  • Pendant light – boutique in North Carolina
  • Round jute rug – Overstock (affiliate link)
  • Dining chairs – Pottery Barn (years ago)
  • Dried seed pod – Terrain (affiliate link)
  • Chalkboard – DIY by me (made from old dresser mirror)
  • Large glass jar – Ballard Designs
  • Wooden buffet – bought years ago from furniture store in Georgia
  • Fiddle leaf fig – Home Depot
  • Woven shades – Blinds.com

Check out a few DIY projects from this space…

Turn a beautiful vintage mirror into a cool kitchen chalkboard with paint. Love this DIY! | Chatfield CourtVintage Mirror to Kitchen Chalkboard

Painted black window frames in the kitchen | Chatfield Court

Painted Black Window Frames

 

Sharing at Between Naps on the Porch, Savvy Southern Style

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This post is sponsored by Wayfair and Nostalgic Warehouse. I did receive product but, as always, all opinions are my own. 

I’m so excited to share a project that has been a year in the making, updating our old bathroom doors with new glass door knobs. Living in a 1946 stone cottage has it’s charm but also it’s problems. Well, it has a lot of problems but we’ll just focus on one today…the old doors and door knobs. 

I actually love the old doors. They’re paneled solid wood with original (for the most part) glass door knobs. They’re beautiful but most of them don’t close right, if at all, and some of the glass door knobs are either painted over, falling off or missing pieces. These doors have seen a lot of action in their 70 years and it shows.  

The door that is used the most is the first in line for some attention, the bathroom door. Thankfully it closes but at some point the old glass knob was switched out for a more modern knob, complete with smears of paint.

Updating old doors with new glass door knobs | Chatfield Court Not the look we’re going for. So when Wayfair reached out to me about their Touches of Elegance campaign, I knew it was the perfect campaign for us. We were asked to pick out new door knobs for one room of the house from Nostalgic Warehouse’s beautiful selection. Every door knob in the house needs some kind of attention but the bathroom is used the most so the choice was easy.

Updating old doors with new glass door knobs | Chatfield CourtAlthough the main door closed without an issue, the closet door was another matter. We haven’t been able to close it properly since we moved in and every time you would open the main bathroom door, it would hit the closet door. 

The closet door knob was a real mess. There was old paint all over it and the door frame was in need of repair. I knew it was in bad shape, but I never realized how bad until I started taking pictures. Eeeek!

Updating old doors with new glass door knobs | Chatfield CourtOf course me being me, I couldn’t just remove the old door knobs and replace with the new. Nope…not in this house. I had to do a little makeover on both doors so (A) they would close properly, and (B) so they would look their very best for our beautiful new glass door knobs.

The main door just needed a few spots caulked and a fresh coat of paint (SW Pure White) but the closet door needed a bit more attention. We had to remove it, along with the hinges that had layers and layers of paint on them, so that we could sand down the edges to allow the door to close properly. Apparently, the door had been painted a ton of times over its 70 years and, with each coat, it built up and prevented the door from closing. Luckily some sanding fixed the issue (actually a lot of sanding). It’s not perfect but it’s so much better.

Updating old doors with new glass door knobs | Chatfield CourtWe also had to scrape and paint the closet door frame. OMG, talk about ugly. It was a mess. And yes…at some point the doorway was painted burgundy. 

Updating old doors with new glass door knobs | Chatfield Court

I’ve been dreading this project since we moved in but it was time. I scraped the loose paint and filled all of the holes. The right thing to do would be to strip the frame and start over but it’s a huge job that’s at the bottom of the list. At some point we’ll do it right but, for now, it looks better and it closes. Plus it has that beautiful brass and glass door knob to distract you.

Once the scraping and painting was done, we added the door knob to the main door. I went with Crystal Glass Privacy Door Knob with Studio Plate by Nostalgic Warehouse for the main door. It was an easy install and, in just a few minutes, the door was transformed. No more paint smear on a door knob that didn’t match the era of the house. 

Updating 2 old doors in a 1946 stone cottage bathroom with a lot of elbow grease, a bit of paint and beautiful new glass door knobs. An easy DIY to add vintage charm to your home. | Chatfield Court

Updating 2 old doors in a 1946 stone cottage bathroom with some elbow grease, paint and beautiful new glass door knobs. An easy DIY to add vintage charm to your home. | Chatfield Court

Full disclosure here…
 
Things didn’t go the way we’d hoped with this project, which happens a lot but, because I’m always honest with you about our projects, I thought it only right to share everything that happened. The good and the bad.
 

The closet door was a bit more involved. I ordered a passage knob and it ended up not fitting. The door is only 1 1/16″ thick so it was tricky getting something new to fit a thin door. I worked with Nostalgic Warehouse, who went above and beyond to find a solution for me, but we just couldn’t get it to work. It was nothing that they did wrong, it’s just an old door, and an odd size. 

You can see the difference in the thickness of the doors in this photo.

Updating old doors with new glass door knobs | Chatfield Court

In the end we went with the Crystal Glass Double Dummy Door Knob with Studio Plate by Nostalgic Warehouse, which doesn’t have a latch. 

Besides the fact that there isn’t a latch for the door, we had to move plate and glass door knob down a few inches, otherwise the plate would have rested over the panel. Not a good look.

The knob looks beautiful but we still have the holes where the latch and the strike plate go. They aren’t centered with the new placement of the glass door knob, so they will have to get filled in and painted.  

Updating a closet door in a stone cottage bathroom with some elbow grease, paint and beautiful new glass door knobs. A quick and easy DIY to add vintage charm to your home. | Chatfield Court

Updating 2 old doors in a stone cottage bathroom with some elbow grease, paint and beautiful new glass door knobs. A quick and easy DIY to add vintage charm to your home. | Chatfield CourtWe still need to figure out a way to latch the door because it doesn’t close tight on it’s own. Something that will allow us to open and close it easily. I’ll keep you posted on what we end up doing.

The new door knobs though?

Oh my… 

I really love the way they look! I have antique brass scattered throughout the house, including the bathroom, so these glass door knobs fit in beautifully.

Updating old doors in a cottage bathroom with some elbow grease, paint and beautiful new glass door knobs. A quick and easy DIY to add vintage charm to your home. | Chatfield CourtNow I’m anxious to get to all of the other doors. 

After I figure out a way to butter up the hubs. 😉

Updating old doors in a cottage bathroom with some elbow grease, paint and beautiful new glass door knobs. An easy DIY to add vintage charm to your home. | Chatfield Court

Thanks so much for stopping in. I hope you have a great weekend!

 

 

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Let’s talk about painted black window frames again (like we did here).

I know I’m getting ahead of myself. You haven’t seen my completed dining area yet, but I finally finished the painted back window frames in the kitchen/dining area and had to share. 

I owe you a tour of the completed dining area, and I promise I’ll share that next time, but you would have had to peek at the windows so I just thought we’d check them out first.

This is what we started with…

Looking for an easy and inexpensive way to add custom storage and a farmhouse look to your kitchen? Install reclaimed wood shelving for under $50. | Chatfield Court Our house was built in 1946 and it had metal casement windows throughout. Most have been replaced but we still have 3 on the main floor. Two big ones in the kitchen/dining area and one in the “castle” bedroom (our nickname for the one guest bedroom). 

I love these windows and they are one of the things that sold me on this house when we looked at it. Besides letting in tons of light, they add so much character to the space. 

They were freshly painted white before we bought the house but I wanted to paint them black from the moment we moved in. My dear hubs wasn’t buying my vision…at all…but after talking about it for months, I finally did what any woman would do when she has her mind made up. 

I went for it (and got that look because he just couldn’t grasp my vision). 

I knew it wouldn’t be a quick project but I didn’t expect it to be as tough as it was. It wasn’t really hard, it was just time consuming. Four coats of paint, lots of scraping and several rounds of touch-ups to transform these beauties.

Although it took a lot of time, it was a very inexpensive project. I had a quart of paint and didn’t even use half of it for both windows. So, if you want a big change and a lot of bang for your buck, this a the perfect project.

Painted Black Window Frames | Chatfield CourtI tried to use painter’s tape on the first window but it was a bust. While I carefully tried to remove it (after I scored it), it pulled the paint off. Not good when you spend so much time painting.  I ended up having to repaint the outer frame again, with lots of touch-ups to the windowsill afterwards.

It’s all good in the end because they look great.

Painted Black Window Frames | Chatfield CourtThere’s 70 years worth of paint on these windows which means lots of old drips and plenty of layers. They are old and it shows. The ideal thing to do would be to strip the old paint off and start fresh but that isn’t on my to-do list.

Change up the look in any room with painted black window frames. An easy and inexpensive DIY project. | Chatfield Court

Change up the look in the dining room with painted black window frames. An easy and inexpensive DIY project. | Chatfield CourtI did the dining area window first and then moved on to the beast, the kitchen window. 

Besides the fact that it’s bigger, it’s over the sink so it was harder to reach comfortably.

Change up the look in the kitchen with painted black window frames. An easy and inexpensive DIY project. | Chatfield Court

Change up the look in the kitchen and dining room with painted black window frames. An easy and inexpensive DIY project. | Chatfield CourtHere is the first appearance of the new addition to our family. Leo, the fiddle leaf fig. 🙂  I’m able to have him because of all that light shining through the windows. Is it weird or do you name your plants too?

Change up the look in any room of your house with painted black window frames. An easy and inexpensive DIY project. | Chatfield CourtI’m in love with the way the windows look! 

The black really brings out the character of the windows. It just adds so much to this room. I’m so glad I went with my instincts.

Oh, and hubs…

He loves them too! I knew he would even if he didn’t.  😉

Transform any room of your house with painted black window frames. An easy and inexpensive DIY project to change the look of your white trim window. | Chatfield Court

Transform any room of your house with painted black window frames. An easy and inexpensive DIY project to change the look of your white trim window to give it a vintage, European look. | Chatfield CourtI do love them but I’m glad that they aren’t through the whole house. It would take forever to paint them all. 

How about you? Would you ever paint your window frames black?

Change up the look in any room of your house with painted black window frames. An easy and inexpensive DIY project to change the look of your boring white trim window. | Chatfield Court

 

Check out more DIY projects we’ve done in the kitchen…

Open Shelving in the Kitchen for Under $50

Easy Kitchen Island Makeover

 

 

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This time last year decorating for spring was the farthest thing from my mind. We were busy packing up our house and getting ready for our big move from Illinois to North Carolina so I wasn’t able to do any spring decorating. This year things are more settled. We are enjoying life in our little stone cottage and I’m excited to get the house decorated for our first spring.

Wow! This cute spring front door basket, made from bunches of faux forsythia, is so pretty and it's a super easy DIY craft project. It just took minutes to do | Chatfield Court

I’ve already busted out some of my spring pillows and I have been enjoying the pretty spring blooms I’ve gotten from the store, but my front door was looking sad.

I took the basket I had filled with greens off the door after Christmas thinking that I’d hang something else up, but that never happened. I thought about hanging the wreath I made a few years ago, but couldn’t find it in the moving mess in the basement, so I pulled out the basket again. This time around it would be the spring front door basket of my dreams.

Just kidding…

I just wanted something that looked spring-y and was easy to do.  

I usually keep it simple when I do something like this and I stuck with that same idea this time. I picked up a few spring stems when Hobby Lobby was having their 50% off sale and I was ready to create. 

Quick and Easy Spring Front Door Basket | Chatfield Court Supplies

  • Basket
  • 6 forsythia branches
  • 1  leafy green stem
  • wire cutters
  • jute rope
  • floral foam (optional)

I try to pick out realistic looking stems, or as close to realistic as possible, without spending a fortune. I liked the middle group the best (the 2 with the light brown stems) but they were pricey so I only got 2 and went with a cheaper bunch to mix in. In all, with the 50% off, I spent under $20 for all of the stems and I can use them again for something else. 

Since it was already in there, I made use of the floral foam in the bottom of the basket. I could easily do this without it so if you don’t want to buy it, or don’t have any, you can still successfully build your spring basket. 

Quick and Easy Spring Front Door Basket | Chatfield CourtNo pictures of the next part because my method is a trade secret.

Not really…

I just used my wire cutters to shorten the stems and shoved them in. I know…very technical and it took years of practice. 😉

Once they were all in, I just moved them around until I liked the way they looked. Seriously, that’s it.

With my flowers in place, I wanted some kind of bow on the basket. My first thought was burlap but I couldn’t find it (remember the mess in the basement I talked about earlier?) so I went with what I could find…jute rope.

Not my first choice but it’s rustic and quirky and a little different, just like me. 

A couple loops around, 2 bows (because 2 are better than 1) and it’s done. 

Love it! This cute spring front door basket, made from bunches of faux forsythia, is so pretty and it's a super easy DIY craft project. It just took minutes to do | Chatfield CourtThis basket is pretty big so we can only hang it on the screen door. It will be protected under the cover porch so it won’t get hit with any weather. 

Awesome! This cute spring front door basket, made from bunches of faux forsythia, is so pretty and it's a super easy DIY craft project. It just took minutes to do | Chatfield Court

I love how it looks and it really brightens up my front door. Now I feel like I’m ready for spring, if only our weather would cooperate. 

This spring front door basket, made from bunches of faux forsythia, is so pretty and it's a super easy DIY craft project. It just took minutes to do | Chatfield CourtHave you pulled any of your spring stuff out yet?

As always, thanks so much for stopping by. Hope you have a great week!

Check out these other easy DIY spring projects

DIY Spring Mason Jars

How to Make a Burlap Bow

 

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