When I was growing up, my family and I lived in a tiny town and a small house that only had 1 bathroom (with no shower). After we moved into our big (to us) house with 2 1/2 bathrooms (and a shower), I never wanted to go back. I learned at the ripe age of 13 that you don’t really realize what you’re missing until you have it. 

I’ve lived in 10 different homes since that “big house”, and most of them had 2 bathrooms. The home we’re in now, our little stone cottage, is not on the 2 bathroom list. We only have one (small) bathroom and no room for another.

A small powder room addition to a little stone cottage.

Or so we thought.

We’ve been talking about adding a 2nd bathroom since the first day we looked at this house with our realtor. Once we moved in, we went from room to room looking for extra square footage to add that precious 2nd bath. It didn’t have to be fancy, or big. Just enough space for a toilet and sink. 

After a lot of thought we finally found some extra room for a small powder room. It’s tiny, to be sure, but it will house a toilet and a sink, which is all we really need. A big plus is that it’s right next to our existing bathroom, which means the plumbing will be easier to do.

So where did we get this extra space?

We found it in one of the guest bedroom closets. There are only 3 closets in the whole house so it was a difficult decision to get rid of one. Once we started measuring and planning though, we found a way to make a smaller closet next to the powder room, that was dead space anyway.  

There was a lot of planning, measuring and debating going on about this tiny space but I think that it’ll all work out. The room isn’t completely done yet, but I thought I’d share what we’ve done so far and ideas on how we’ll finish it.

Here’s where we started. We’re pretty sure that this closet was added to the bedroom by a previous owner. It’s pretty evident by the look of the doors and the sheetrock they used to build the outer wall.

Taking a closet space and turning it into a small powder room.

Turning a bedroom closet into a small powder room.

We removed the shoes and clothes and began demo. The shelves and rods came out as well as all the molding and the sliding doors. 

Demo of the bedroom closet before the walls for the new powder room are built.

A lot of measuring and planning went into this tiny space. Everything has to fit just so and, of course, nothing is square. 

Once we had a plan and a list, it was time to shop for supplies. We purchased the lumber and building materials at Home Depot (*affiliate link), but the sink, mirror and lighting were all bought online. 

Framing the walls during the small powder room transformation.

The first thing we had to do was frame the walls and place the electrical boxes. The plan was to add two sconces, one outlet and 2 light switches. 

Next we hung the sheetrock on the newly framed walls.

Adding sheetrock and electric during the small powder room build.

We debated between paint and wallpaper but found that the original plaster was in pretty rough shape. After a couple of debates (he wanted paint and I wanted paper), we changed our plans and made the decision to plank the walls. 

Even though it’s a small room, it took a lot of planks (we used 4 sheets of plywood). We cut the sheets into planks, sanded and painted the edges.

The easy way (or is it the lazy way?). 😉

Painting the wood planks before installing them on the powder room walls.

I wanted to have spaces between each plank, and didn’t want to see the blue paint showing through, so we threw a quick coat of paint up before we installed the planks.

Installing wood planks in a new small powder room.

Once the planks were up, I got busy patching and sanding the holes (all 5000 of them).

Just kidding…but it felt like it was 5000.

Wood planks hung and ready for paint during a small powder room build.

Next it was time for paint. I went with Benjamin Moore Advance in White Dove to help the space feel bigger and brighter.

We used this same paint color on our kitchen cabinets in our Illinois house so I knew I would love it in here.

Adding wood planks as we built a small powder room.

The space is looking great and nothing like the closet it once was. I still have to caulk the ceiling and corners and we need to add molding. The next big project though, is the custom vanity that we’ll build for our new space. 

This project is coming along quickly and I want to keep you up to date, so I’ll share more next week. It’s all about adding some pretty touches!

Happy weekend!

Another remodel project we did was the kitchen reno in our Illinois house. If you haven’t checked it out yet, you can see more of it here

Reveal of a small and dark kitchen turned into a white and bright space with tons of storage.

Kitchen Remodel Reveal

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There’s been a lot of changes in the living room the past few months. Some projects are complete, like the basement doorthe mantel and the fireplace, but there’s still some work to be done. The last project I recently completed was new curtains, which included DIY custom curtain rods.

If you’ve followed me for a while then you may have noticed that I’m not really a curtain kind of girl. I love to look at them in other people’s homes, I’m just not a fan of them in my own. Part of the reason is that I like to keep things pretty simple, including the windows. Another reason I don’t like them, if I’m being totally honest, is because they get dusty and it ends up being something else I have to clean.

Nope..curtains are just not my thing.

Empty living room before furniture was added and the DIY custom curtain rods and curtains were installed.

This isn’t only about the curtains though, it’s about the DIY custom curtain rods. So let’s get to it.

The picture above is the room right before we moved in. The previous owners had blinds in the window that didn’t fit properly and blocked a lot of light. So, down they came and up went a lined, woven shade in their place.

Here’s the living room after the new shade was hung. It’s certainly simple but a little too simple for me.

The window, and room, needed something soft, like curtains. I tried to live with the simple look for months but I just couldn’t deny it any longer…this space needed curtains.

Living room window before the DIY custom curtain rods and curtains were hung.

I still wanted to keep it simple, and not block any precious sunlight, so I decided to try sheer linen panels. Once I found panels, I had to decide on a curtain rod. This room is tiny, but the window is pretty large, so I knew that I didn’t want the distraction of big, long rod. We would never close the curtains anyway, so there was no reason to put up a full rod. DIY custom curtain rods (half rods) were the solution.

I knew what I wanted, and I knew that I could easily make them, so I went for it. 

 Supplies to make your own custom curtain rods

  • 2, 1/2″  floor flanges ($4.96 each)
  • 2, 1/2″ elbows ($1.87 each)
  • 2, 1/2″ x 12″ black pipe ($4.98 each)
  • 2, 1/2″ iron caps ($1.87)
  • 2, 1/2″ x 2″ nipple ($1.84)
  • 4 wood screws
  • 2 packages curtain clips ($7.47 each)

The supplies needed to make DIY custom curtain rods, black pipe and curtain clips

Once I got all of my supplies home, hanging them was pretty easy. Just remember…when you work with this kind of pipe, you need to wipe it all down really well. It’s pretty greasy and will turn anything it touches black, including your walls and your curtains.

When I hung the rod I made sure I hit a beam with both of my screws to keep everything sturdy and secure. 

I’m still not finished painting the room but here’s a sneak peak of the color and the new rods. 

The completed DIY custom curtain rods hung over the living room window in less than 15 minutes.

It literally took me less than 15 minutes to hang the rods on each end of the window, as well as the curtain panels.

Simple DIY custom curtain rods and curtains hung over the living room window.

Simple.

It took me a while to get used to the look but I like it so much better. It softens this area without blocking the sunlight. And I love that there isn’t a black rod going across the whole window.  

How to customize your room by making DIY custom curtain rods for the living room using black pipe and fittings.

I’m still having one issue in this room (besides the fact that it’s too small and has an awkward layout). The sofa isn’t centered on the window. We’ve tried removing the hubs’ favorite chair and moving the couch down but we really need the extra seating. Remember, this is a small room and the window wall is the only space for furniture. It’s not perfect design-wise but it is comfortable for the two of us. Comfort is more important than design aesthetic. 

How to customize a living room by making DIY custom curtain rods using black pipe and fittings.

So, in the end, I’m loving the new curtains and my DIY rods. Will I hang curtains in more windows around the house? Probably not.

But I guess I should say…”never say never”.

How to easily customize a living room by making DIY custom curtain rods using black pipe and fittings.

Are you a curtain person, or do you like to keep your windows simple?

Sources

(Affiliate links used. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, I will receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. Please see my Privacy Policy for more info.)

  • All black pipe and curtain rings – The Home Depot (affiliate link)
  • Linen sheers – Crate and Barrel (affiliate link)
  • Coffee Table – West Elm (affiliate link)
  • Wooden stool with dipped legs – Serena and Lily (affiliate link)
  • Blue Washed Velvet Pillow Cover – Pottery Barn (affiliate link)
  • Floor lamp – Pottery Barn (affiliate link)
  • Striped Pillows – Etsy
  • Round woven tray – Target
  • Woven Shade – Blinds.com
  • Sunburst mirror – Target (from a few years ago)

 

Some of my other living room projects…

Adding a wood mantel to an existing mantel so a tv can fit on top.

DIY Fireplace Mantel

Easy makeover completed on a brick fireplace using paint.

Quick and Easy Fireplace Makeover

Easy DIY custom curtain rods for the living room using black pipe and curtain clips.

You can also find me at Between Naps on the PorchWorthing Court, Savvy Southern Style, French Country Cottage

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In my last post I shared my new kitchen light and hinted about the one last project I had for this space. It’s a DIY wood sign that is hanging over my kitchen sink and I think it’s the perfect finishing touch for my space. 

A couple of supplies and a few minutes are all you need to make this easy DIY wood sign for the kitchen or any room in your home.

I’ve known that I wanted to hang something in this spot since we moved in and I’ve been searching, but haven’t found anything that fit.

A few supplies and a few minutes are all you need to make this easy DIY wood sign for the kitchen or any space in your home.

One day it hit me…”Helllloooo? Aren’t you all about DIY?” 

“Why yes…yes, I am!”

I could make my own and get the perfect size. 

It just so happened that I had a piece of barn wood that I got from an estate sale for $2. I hadn’t used it for any other projects because it was badly warped and falling apart. I thought I’d give it a shot and, if it didn’t work because the condition of the wood, I would get another piece and try again. 

DIY Wood Sign for the Kitchen

Supplies to make a DIY wood sign

  • piece of wood cut to size (I used old barn wood)
  • stencil (or make your own)
  • paint
  • brush
  • sandpaper
  • picture hangers

I would usually go DIY all the way but there were a few issues to deal with that lead me to break down and buy a stencil.

The first problem was that the wood was rough and flaky with a very uneven surface. I did try to use individual stencils that I already had but, because of the condition of the wood, I couldn’t get them straight. I also have very shaky hands so doing any of it freehand was just not going to work.

So I bit the bullet and I bought a stencil on Etsy. There’s a ton of sellers who offer these and most will customize them to the size you need.

DIY Wood Sign for the Kitchen

Once I had my customized stencil, my sign came together very quickly. 

I centered the stencil, using some painter’s tape to keep everything straight, and started to paint.

It took 11 minutes to do the whole thing. That’s it! 

After I was done painting, I carefully removed the stencil and let the paint dry. 

Once dry, I went over some of the letters with fine sand paper, just to give it more of a rustic look.

Then I added the picture hangers and hung it up.

A couple of supplies are all you need to make this easy DIY wood sign for the kitchen or any room in your home.

So easy! A couple of supplies and a few minutes are all you need to make this rustic DIY wood sign for the kitchen or any space in your home.

I wasn’t sure how my sign would hang with the board being warped, but I think it’s ok. After all, it’s supposed to be rustic, right?

So easy! A couple of supplies and a few minutes are all you need to make this rustic DIY wood sign for the kitchen or any room in your home.

So easy! A couple of supplies are all you need to make this rustic DIY wood sign for the kitchen or any room in your home.

Now that the DIY wood sign is hung, I can officially call the kitchen done. 

What kind of project are you working on right now?

 

Check out a couple more projects I’ve completed to put this space together.

DIY open shelving in the kitchen using barn wood and inexpensive shelf brackets.DIY Open Shelving in the Kitchen

 

Painting window frames black to give a space rustic farmhouse charm.Painted Black Window Frames

 

 

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You would think that replacing a basement door would be a simple weekend project, right? You would be so wrong because, in this house, no project is ever quick or easy.

This one took us 3 months to finish. Yup, we started way back in January. We didn’t work on it the whole time, but it did take a lot longer than we thought.

Upgrade and replace an interior basement door by recycling an old door. It's an inexpensive DIY project that anyone can do. | Chatfield Court

This is where we began. The basement door is in our small living room so we have to look at it every night when we watch tv. It really doesn’t look all that bad in the photo but it was. The dog/cat door was big and bulky, chewed up and glued shut. 

Replace an interior basement door | Chatfield Court

The inside of the door was plain old nasty. I think the previous owners locked their dog in the basement and it chewed and clawed the door. You can also see the lovely pink spray foam insulation. Insulation is a good thing and has its place, but this stuff is everywhere in our house. All I know is that whoever sprayed it certainly did a thorough job. Yikes!

Replace an interior basement door | Chatfield Court
The first thing we had to do was to remove that ugly door. Both the door and the frame had metal stripping around them, to make a good seal, so it all had to be removed too. After we removed all of the metal strips, we had to scrape the old, chippy paint and repair all the holes. 

Replace an interior basement door | Chatfield Court

We had planned on buying a new door but found an old one in the basement that fit the opening of the doorway. That was a huge bonus but…

There’s always a but. 😉

The only problem was that the door was a mess. It needed to be scraped and sanded on both sides before it could be painted. Even after we sanded and painted the door it was far from perfect but, when you have an old home, nothing is perfect. 

Replace an interior basement door | Chatfield Court

So, instead of looking at the ugly door, we looked at an open doorway and 2 boxes for 3 months. The boxes were our idea of a cheap baby gate to keep Finn from wandering into the basement. 

Replace an interior basement door | Chatfield Court

Finally the “new” door went up. The fit isn’t perfect because the doorway isn’t perfectly square but, as I said…

Old house=nothing is perfect. 

Upgrade and replace an interior basement door by recycling an old door. This is an inexpensive DIY project that anyone can do. | Chatfield Court

I tried to recycle everything when I could, including the hardware, but it just wasn’t useable. The door knob was old but not original glass like the others in the house and the metal hinges were caked with paint. 

I replaced the old generic knob with another glass knob from Nostalgic Warehouse, exactly like the ones I used in the bathroom recently. I can’t tell you how much I love them. 

How to replace an interior basement door by recycling an old door. This is an inexpensive DIY project anyone can do. | Chatfield Court

We had to modify the door a bit to get the new door knobs to fit. Luckily the new door knob plate covers the ugly holes. 

Replace an interior basement door | Chatfield Court

I think it looks so much better than it did before. Like it’s been here all along. 

How you can easily upgrade and replace an interior basement door by recycling an old door. This is an inexpensive DIY project that anyone can do. | Chatfield Court

I’m so glad that we found this door in the basement. Finding a new door that matched the others would have been tough, and expensive.

How to upgrade and replace an interior basement door by recycling an old door. This is an inexpensive DIY project that anyone can do. | Chatfield Court

Another project crossed off the long list. Progress! 

 

Check out another project that we recently completed in the living room, the DIY fireplace mantel. 

A DIY fireplace mantel makeover to accommodate a flat screen tv in a small living room. A simple and easy fix using a large piece of white pine wood and paint. www.chatfieldcourt.com

DIY Fireplace Mantel

 

 

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